Fit Photographer | Meat & Nut Breakfast

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The meat and nut breakfast. Simple and effective. What is it and why is it so important? Before we get into it I want you to know that I learned this from someone who is very successful in the strength and conditioning world, Charles Poliquin. Over the years he has been extremely adamant about trying to implement this into people’s daily routine.

What: The meat and nut breakfast is combining a meat of your choice (to an extent) and nuts of your choice. When choosing a meat use the best sources, meaning grass fed beef, free range organic chicken, any form of wild meat, nitrate-free bacon, etc. At this point you have to wrap your head around eating something other than what we consider “breakfast” foods. Then you add in a handful of nuts. It’s not an exact science. Vary the source of meat and nuts you use in the mornings so that you won’t get bored or develop any food intolorances.

How Much: Try making your meat source 20-30 grams plus a handful of nuts.

Why: The most important question. The protein from the animal source of meat and the combination of the fats from the nuts are a great way to keep your blood sugar regulated throughout the day. This meal basically sets you up for the entire day. The gut is referred to as the second brain. When your gut is happy your brain is happy. You have neurotransmitters in your gut that signal the brain. Basically, a meat and nut breakfast turns on your neurotransmitters for the day. When you turn on those neurotransmitters everything is running and performing optimally.

What I recommend doing is trying it for two weeks. Monitor how you feel and your sleep patterns. I can’t recommend this type of breakfast enough. Let us know what you think. Ditch the cereal and enjoy that chicken breast and cashews for breakfast! ~Erik

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Susan Fritts McConnell - I like the bowl in the photo too….where did you get it?

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